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“In the beginner’s mind, there are many possibilities. In the expert’s mind, there are few.” Never stop learning. When you feel that you’ve hit a wall,begin again and take another angle on it. Always push yourself to become a student again.

Highlights

Amateurs are not afraid to make mistakes or look ridiculous in public. They’re in love, so they don’t hesitate to do work that others think of as silly or just plain stupid.

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The world is changing at such a rapid rate that it’s turning us all into amateurs. Even for professionals, the best way to flourish is to retain an amateur’s spirit and embrace uncertainty and the unknown.

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The best way to get started on the path to sharing your work is to think about what you want to learn, and make a commitment to learning it in front of others.

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Be on the lookout for voids that you can fill with your own efforts, no matter how bad they are at first.

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Don’t show your lunch or your latte; show your work.

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You find time the same place you find spare change: in the nooks and crannies.

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When you share your taste and your influences, have the guts to own all of it. Don’t give in to the pressure to self-edit too much.

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“The biggest problem of success is that the world conspires to stop you doing the thing that you do, because you are successful,” writes author Neil Gaiman.

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Instead of taking a break in between projects, waiting for feedback, and worrying about what’s next, use the end of one project to light up the next one.

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The designer Stefan Sagmeister swears by the power of the sabbatical—every seven years, he shuts down his studio and takes a year off. His thinking is that we dedicate the first 25 years or so of our lives to learning, the next 40 to work, and the last 15 to retirement, so why not take 5 years off retirement and use them to break up the work years?

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Look for something new to learn, and when you find it, dedicate yourself to learning it out in the open. Document your progress and share as you go so that others can learn along with you. Show your work, and when the right people show up, pay close attention to them, because they’ll have a lot to show you.

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Books I’ve read.

Johannes Holmberg

Tiny summaries on books I’ve read. Sorted by latest read. But you can also sort on top recommendations. Highlights and covers are copyright to their respective authors.